‘Waking Lions’ Reflects on Immigrants and Moral Choices

Posted on June 25th, 2018
By Stewart Kampel for Hadassah Magazine


There are two distinct parts to Waking Lions by Israeli novelist Ayelet Gundar-Goshen. In the first part, Dr. Eitan Green, an Israeli neurosurgeon, inadvertently kills a black Eritrean immigrant near Beersheba during a late-night joy ride and then fails to report the car accident.

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Spies and the Mossad, a Trio of Novels

Posted on June 18th, 2018
By Curt Schleier for Hadassah Magazine

 

In real life, the Mossad, Israel’s intelligence agency, has successfully secured the safety of the State of Israel. In a less covert but still dramatic way, the Mossad has also had an impact on the genre of spy literature. Spies no longer have to be a thin-lipped James Bond type or a George Smiley, as this trio of books demonstrates with varying degrees of success.

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A new edge-of-your-seat literary thriller from an award-winning author

Posted on June 11th, 2018
From madmimi


A vibrant, propulsive literary thriller that charts the high-stakes journey of a young man trying to find his place in a country that has lost its way


As the 1980s draw to a close, South Africa is a maelstrom of political violence with the apartheid regime in its death throes. Young Martin Helger is the struggling odd duck at an elite private boys school in Johannesburg, with his father a rough-handed scrap dealer and his brother a mysterious legend.

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10 Writers Not Named Philip Roth Capturing the Female American Jewish Experience

Posted on June 4th, 2018
BY EMILY BURACK for Kveller

 

10 Writers That Actually Get American Jewish Women
 

Who is capturing and writing the American Jewish woman’s experience? A whole lot of talented writers, it turns out. Here are 10 of them.

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Jewish, Ugly, Weird, Oversexed, Gross

Posted on May 28th, 2018
By Rachel Shteir for Tablet Magazine


Aline Kominsky-Crumb is the Jewish woman’s Philip Roth. Her reissued and updated collection, ‘Love That Bunch,’ is a satisfying epic of modern feminism.


I wish I had discovered Aline Kominsky-Crumb when I was growing up alienated in WASPy Princeton, New Jersey in the 1970s and 1980s. Her violent, raunchy, expressionist-confessional comic strips, many published in underground magazines, might have consoled me, at least for a while. Those were, otherwise, largely depressing years, even today aggravated by my parents’ inability to consider my despair. “You were such a happy baby?” they say, apparently mystified when I even mention my teen-aged angst.

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